Duck


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Rougié

Founded in 1875 and based in the medieval town of Sarlat in the beautiful Périgord region of France, Rougié is the world’s #1 producer of foie gras and moulard duck specialties.

Rougié is the active partner of award winning restaurants around the world, always bringing innovative culinary solutions for consistently outstanding duck delicacies.

All products are carefully crafted in USDA-approved plants following the strictest HACCP standards.

As part of the Euralis Gastronomie group, Rougié fully integrates its production process “from the corn field to the plate”.

rougie.duck.confit.large.gif Rougie Duck Confit
Rougie Duck Confit
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Great for cassoulet, duck confit salads, and many other recipes such as confit à la périgourdine, confit à la béarnaise, confit à la basquaise, Chausson of duck Confit with Foie Gras and Duck confit in Aumonieres.

No hassles, simply heat and enjoy!

  • Traditional French confit.
  • Slowly cooked and preserved in its own duck fat.
  • Cooked twice for a great “fall-off-the-bone” effect.
  • Smooth, moist and tender.
  • All natural, no preservatives.
  • Pork Free.

Round can, shelf stable for 3 years at room temperature.

Ingredients: 4 moulard duck legs, duck fat, water, salt, pepper.

4 legs, 52.91 ounces including 24 ounces duck fat (1.5 kg).

Price: $59.99 Quantity
rougie.duck.rillettes.jpg Rougie Périgord Duck Rillettes

Rillettes are made by cubing delicate meats, salting them, and then slowly cooking them in fat until they are tender enough to be easily shredded. They are then cooled with a small amount of fat in order to form a paste which can then be spread on bread or toast.

Ready to eat.

Chill in refrigerator 30 minutes before serving for best results.

Refrigerate after opening

Ideal for 2 to 4 people.

Ingredients: duck meat, water, toasted wheat crumbs (wheat flour, durum flour, baking powder, yeast), white wine (white wine, salt, pepper, sulfites), onions, salt, pepper, herbs, garlic, nutmeg, sodium erythorbate, sodium nitrites. (Contains wheat and sulfites.)

Glass jar, shelf stable for 4 years at room temperature.

2.8 ounces (80 grams)

Price: $12.95 Quantity
rougie.duck.fat.gif Rougie Duck Fat

Duck fat is a traditional tasty and healthy alternative to butter.

  • Ideal for frying potatoes.
  • Make your own duck fat fries.
  • Melt 1/4 cup of duck fat, add sliced carrots, and slowly roast them. Sweet, delicious carrots!
  • Use duck fat rather than butter to make your pancakes.
  • Make your own home-made confit.

Rendered fat, filtered, fully cooked.

Pork free.

Glass jar, shelf stable for 4 years at room temperature.

11.28 ounces (320 grams)

Price: $14.95 Quantity
rougie.terrine.jpg Rougie Périgord Pork & Duck Terrine with 20% Foie Gras

Back in stock January 2015.

This wonderfully tasty coarse pâté with pork, duck meat, 20% duck foie gras, duck liver, and port wine can be spread on bread or toast to make a fantastic appetizer or tasty afternoon snack. Great for picnics!

Fully cooked, ready to eat.

Refrigerate before opening. Serve chilled but not ice cold. Use a knife to serve spreadable portions.

Ideal for 2-4 people.

Glass jar, shelf stable for 4 years at room temperature.

2.8 ounces (80 grams)

Price: $21.95
On Sale! $15.95
Quantity

NUTRITIONAL FACTS

Whether as meat or in the form of foie gras, gastronomic products made from fattened ducks contain unsuspected benefits, such as considerable quantities of unsaturated fatty acids.

These unsaturated fatty acids protect the cardiovascular system and generate substances such as Omega-3.

 
Duck Fat
Olive Oil
Butter
Saturated fatty acids
27%
17%
52%
Monounsaturated fatty acids
57%
65%
23%
Polyunsaturated fatty acids
12%
13%
2%

The composition of duck fat is quite similar to that of olive oil. No wonder foie gras aficionados benefit from the “French paradox”!

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